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I have a buddy that has GF intolorence (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten-free_diet) and have been trying to pull together a "beer" for him. You can find recipes online and I have tried a few. The majority of the recipes call for Malted Sorgham. I have been unsuccessful in trying to hide the sorgham flavor as it is noticble in all the GF beers on the market today. I have found other recipes that do not call for sorgham, but rather corn, rice etc..but gettign those to ferment has been my challeng. Any of you guys have any experience in GF brewing?  I really like to make a porter from possibly chestnuts, coffee, toasted millet, and not use sorgham as the base. Thoughts? Suggestions? Thanks.

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Did anything ever come out of this? I am interested in something like this also.
I think you could also try it with buckwheat. The corn or rice might be replaced by corn sugar or rice syrup. The recipe found in the following link does note that some rice syrup contains gluten, so you must read labels carefully.

http://www.mrgoodbeer.com/gf/

Sounds like a good chane to practice your own malting and roasting!!
Why not make a gluten-free beer with an all-barley grist?

Bamforth was talking about it on the BrewStrong Haze show. Seems that chill-haze includes the proteins that cause reactions in celiacs. He mentioned some commercial clarifying agent that eliminates most, if not all, of these proteins. (I don't remember the name of the product; would have to listen again.)

Excerpt from Malting and Brewing Science by Lewis & Bamforth:
"The proteins of haze material primarily arise in the hordein or prolamin (storage) fraction of barley, though some nonprolamins are also present in beer haze. The prolamin fraction increases most in higher nitrogen barley and again explains why low-nitrogen barley is preferred for malting. These alcohol-soluble proteins have a high content of proline, the residue of which seems to be essential for haze formation. They are different from the foam-stabilizing proteins. Incidentally, these proteins are also responsible for the immune reaction experienced by celiacs; haze prevention in beer and rendering the beer "gluten free" are therefore compatible practices."


Also, check out the attached paper (celiac_disease.pdf) written by Professor Lewis...
Attachments:
There you go... Ashley from White Labs mentioned the clarifying agent I talked about above at the club meeting tonight. It's called Brewers Clarex and will be available to homebrewers via White Labs. They're marketing it under the product name Clarity Ferm.
Though not a guarantee. As she said, exercise caution.
Right and some people are more sensitive than others... this might be better called "gluten-reduced" beer.

There's some good discussion (10 pages so far) over at homebrewchatter.com about it:
http://www.homebrewchatter.com/board/f65/brewers-clarex-liquid-yeas...
Though I'm still itching to try brewing one.. I say it might lead to some interesting comparisons if more than one person wants to have a go at it.

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