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I'm a fairly new resident of Lower Bucks County (Levittown, to be exact), and while I received the most recent Water Quality Report from our municipal authority, it was not nearly as detailed as I'd hoped, listing Alkalinity as ppm of CaCO3 only.

I was hoping to get a picture of other trace minerals in our tap water, but even after I called the Lower Bucks County Joint Municipal Authority, I failed to get a solid answer. Apparently they don't keep track of Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Sulfate or Chloride measurements at all there. I thought that perhaps a member of this illustrious community might have access to this information... has anyone in my area gotten a more comprehensive water test done? Does anyone happen to know ppm measurements of any of these things?

Thanks for any info you guys have!
-steve

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Steve,

Grab an empty water bottle out of your recycling, fill it up with tap water and send it off to wardlab.com. Request their "Household Mineral Test". It's $16.50 and gives you everything you need. I got the results via email 3 days after they received my sample.

I live in Hamilton, NJ and my water comes from Trenton Water Works. Here's my report... (click the image to see it full size)

Wow... that's perfect! And at under 17 bucks, a steal... Thanks a lot, Sam! I appreciate it.
I was thinking about this very same thing a couple of weeks ago, and even pestered a couple of neighbors of mine who work in the "field" for tips.

Sam, from what you received back, did it impact any of your recipes, water adjustments, etc?

Thanks,

-e
Yes! I always had trouble brewing hoppy beers and only recently started looking at water. I was really happy with my last IPA (a Lagunitas clone). The magic ingredient... gypsum!

If you look at my report, you'll see that my water only contains about 9ppm Sulfate. I added enough gypsum to give me a Chloride to Sulfate ratio of about 1:6 (36ppm Chloride to 220ppm Sulfate). This ratio was recommended by Colin Kaminsky the head brewer of Downtown Joes in Napa, CA (via facebook).
Cool, thanks!

I wonder how close your water specifics are to mine, seeing as we probably draw from the same source, only to different water works on opposite sides of the river.

I look forward to testing out (in due time) modifying the water profile of what I use.

This could be a good topic for another club meeting, perhaps?

Best,

-e
One more thing, and I think I already know the answer to this (being, no, it has no effect) but I figure I'll just confirm.

Does activated charcoal filtering have any effect on the levels of these minerals? Or is that mainly for chlorine and whatnot?
As far as I know, you're right. Activated charcoal filtration removes chlorine/chloramine and some organic compounds. The sample I sent was filtered through activated charcoal. I decided to send the filtered water because that's what I use to brew with. It shouldn't have any affect on dissolved inorganic solids though.

Here's a cool link: http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/h2oqual/watsys/ae1029w.htm

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